Are You Part Of The Corruption Problem?


What do we say about a man who wants to build a house but steals the blocks every night and sells them cheaply? He will eventually run out of blocks, especially since he sells them faster than he makes new ones. This is the exact situation in several African countries facing economic hardship. The analogy of stealing blocks from one’s own house accurately captures the self-destructive nature of the corruption taking place in those places. Many bad leaders do this on purpose. However, many people do this unknowingly. Are you certain you aren’t part of the problem?

Identifying corrupt leadership isn’t as simple as pointing fingers. Often, those guilty of corruption don’t recognize their own faults. Nobody openly admits to being a bad, corrupt leader. While it’s common to lament the impact of corruption on a country like Nigeria, identifying and holding corrupt leaders accountable is challenging. Many may unknowingly exhibit corrupt and ineffective leadership traits. Many may unknowingly perpetuate corruption in their roles as parents, business owners, directors, public servants or pastors. Are you sure that you’re not a part of the problem? Are you benefiting from the loot of the national commonwealth in any way?

There will always be a way to justify unethical behaviour in the private or public sector. Without self-examination into our roles as parents, business owners, directors, public servants, employees, and pastors, we risk unintentionally continuing corruption. You must reflect on how you’re meeting the standards set by the Bible. Without personal reflection on God’s word, corruption goes unchecked, undermining progress and development. To combat corruption, you must scrutinize your actions and decisions, ensuring integrity and accountability in your leadership roles. Only then can we begin to address the systemic corruption plaguing our communities and work towards a brighter future.


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